The Devon Buy Collection of Fine Minerals and Crystals

My fascination with minerals and crystals began when I was intrigued by the glimmers and shimmers of sparkling quartz speckles on mundane granite stones in my home garden at the age of eight way back in the early 1980s.

amethyst cluster brazil
Assembling a collection of museum-grade specimens can be very costly and organising them takes a lot of time. This fine massive Amethyst cluster from Brazil was a birthday gift to me from my wife.

Initially, I had thought that they were diamonds lodged in rocks and had attempted to dig them out with pointy implements, with much futility I might add. You see, before all this, I was even more in love with diamonds, and had with me some artificial “diamonds” made out of cut glass which I used to carry around.

Apparently, whoever said that thing about glitter and gold could very well have mentioned diamond as well!

A couple of years after, I came to realise what quartz crystals were, and hence began my foray into the appreciation of crystals (and minerals eventually) that continues to this day, over thirty years on. Today, I will be presenting my Crystal and Mineral Collection, including other items of relevant interest.

The Early Years

“…the extent of joy in this hobby was limited to just viewing of such crystals at shops and in books.”

The first crystal which found its way into my possession was, not surprisingly, a quartz crystal. I had personally found this rather small clear twin-point quartz crystal lodged in some laterite soil off the hills in Taman Tun Dr Ismail, Kuala Lumpur, in 1990.

Brandberg Amethyst Namibia

I was then a student in early secondary school, and the extent of joy in this hobby was limited to just viewing of such crystals at shops and in books. Limited funds and small pocket allowance made it impossible to establish a collection. Mining and collecting them by hand was just equally challenging – even common quartz crystals were hard to come by where I live. The twin-point quartz mentioned earlier was sure a lucky find.

“Brandberg Amethysts, as their name suggests, are found in only one part of the world – near Brandberg Mountain in Namibia. They rarely exceed 50 mm in length. I am lucky to own this very fine specimen of 65 mm x 25 mm x 20 mm (above). With a clear point, strong amethyst purple, smoky wisps and phantoms, tiny red Lepidochrosite inclusions and some matrix on its base, this crystal also consists of a moving enhydro bubble – the water trapped within the crystal is likely to be thousands of years old…”

Devon Buy

Acquired on 17 June 2009
 

Establishing a Collection

Classification of Minerals

Minerals today are usually classified based on the Strunz classification (10 groups), or the newer Dana system (78 classes).
For this article, my collection will be presented based on the older Dana classification (9 classes) as follows:

  • I. Native Elements
  • II. Sulphides and Sulphosalts
  • III. Oxides and Hydroxides
  • IV. Halides
  • V. Carbonates, Nitrates and Borates
  • VI. Sulphates, Chromates, Tungstates and Molybdates
  • VII. Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
  • VIII. Silicates
  • IX. Organic Minerals

Fast-forward 15 years later, I was earning a decent salary as an engineer, which saw an opportunity to initiate a collection. As expected, I started the collection with the many varieties of quartz crystals. My deep fascination with quartz crystals was not merely geological but also metaphysical.

The collection eventually advanced on to other interesting specimens of crystals and minerals as well, as will be presented below.

At time of writing, my collection holds about 400 samples and specimens, made up of almost 200 different types of chemical make-up and composition.

It would be quite a daunting task to exhibit them all below, and so I will present only the finer specimens from the collection. These are organised by the major chemical groups based on the older Dana classification which splits minerals into the nine groups as given in the inset box at left.

Advertisement:

 

Here are about 120 geological specimens gathered from around the world, which now forms part of The Devon Buy Collection of Fine Minerals and Crystals:

I. Native Elements

While most minerals are composed of a combination of compounds and chemical make-up, about twenty minerals occur naturally in pure form, divided into three sub-groups: metals, semi-metals and non-metals. See if you can identify the metals from the non-metals below.

Native Copper Michigan USA
Native COPPER; Michigan, USA
crystal and mineral collection
Natural DIAMOND; Congo, Africa
Gold nugget leaf
GOLD nugget leaf; Colorado, USA
crystal and mineral collection
GRAPHITE; Canada
crystal and mineral collection
GOLD specks on Quartz; Wisconsin, USA
crystal and mineral collection
SULPHUR; Mina El Deserto, Bolivia

II. Sulphides and Sulphosalts

These are made from the element sulphur combined with a metal and include some of the most important metal ores. Generally heavy and brittle, many become oxides as soon as they are exposed to weather.

crystal and mineral collection
STIBNITE; China
Stibium Sulphide, Sb2S3
crystal and mineral collection
ARSENOPYRITE with Quartz; China
Iron Arsenic Sulphide, FeAsS
crystal and mineral collection
BORNITE, Peacock Ore; China
Copper Iron Sulphide, Cu5FeS4
crystal and mineral collection
PYRITE; Spain
Iron Sulphide, FeS2
crystal and mineral collection
PYRITE on matrix; Spain
Iron Sulphide, FeS2
crystal and mineral collection
PYRITE cluster with Calcite; unknown locality
Iron Sulphide, FeS2
crystal and mineral collection
Close-up view of the PYRITE at left showing Calcite crystals amongst the cluster
crystal and mineral collection
REALGAR (red) with ORPIMENT (yellow);
Palomo Mine, Peru
Arsenic Sulphide, AsS
crystal and mineral collection
SPHALERITE with Quartz, Calcite and Arsenopyrite; Trep莽a Mine, ex-Yugoslavia
Zinc Sulphide, ZnS

III. Oxides and Hydroxides

Oxides occur when a metal combines with oxygen, forming various physical attributes ranging from dull Tenorite and Limonite to sparkly gems like Rubies and Sapphires (when polished). Note that I prefer to collect specimens in their raw and natural (unpolished) state, and in my samples of ruby and sapphire below, they occur in the natural state as shown. Limonite is the only Hydroxide here.

Hematite
HEMATITE; Morocco
Iron Oxide, Fe2O3
Magnetite
MAGNETITE; Australia
Ferrous-Ferric Oxide, Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Ruby
Ruby, red CORUNDUM; India
Aluminium Oxide, Al2O3
crystal and mineral collection
Sapphire, blue CORUNDUM; Tanzania, Africa
Aluminium Oxide, Al2O3
crystal and mineral collection
CUPRITE in LIMONITE; Arizona, USA
Copper Oxide, Cu2O
crystal and mineral collection
RUTILE; Virginia, USA
Titanium Dioxide, TiO2
crystal and mineral collection
PYROCHLORE; Russia
Mineral Oxide, (Na,Ca)2Nb2O6(OH,F)
crystal and mineral collection
LIMONITE; Colorado, USA
Iron(III) Oxide-Hydroxides, FeO(OH)路nH2O

IV. Halides

Halides are minerals made up of metals that combine with halogen elements such as chlorine, fluorine, bromine and iodine. They are soft and dissolve easily in water, so extra care needs to be taken to keep them dry and away from moisture. Salts like Halite (first sample below) are hard to maintain in my humid country, and cannot simply be left on the shelf without drying agents or other appropriate dehumidification means.

crystal and mineral collection
HALITE; California, USA
Sodium Chloride, NaCl
crystal and mineral collection
Purple FLUORITE cluster; Wenshan Mine, Yunnan, China
Calcium Fluoride, CaF2
crystal and mineral collection
Well-formed green FLUORITE; China
Calcium Fluoride, CaF2
Fluorite Quartz Rogerley Mine England
FLUORITE with Quartz; Rogerley Mine, England
Calcium Fluoride, CaF2
crystal and mineral collection
Pink FLUORITE; Mina Navidad, Rodeo, Durango, Mexico
Calcium Fluoride, CaF2
crystal and mineral collection
Green FLUORITE cluster; China
Calcium Fluoride, CaF2
crystal and mineral collection
FLUORITE, purple; Wenshan Mine, Yunnan, China
Calcium Fluoride, CaF2

V. Carbonates, Nitrates and Borates

Carbonates form when metals combine with a carbonate group (CO3) comprising of carbon and oxygen. Likewise for nitrates (NO3) and borates (BO3) – with nitrogen and boron. Calcite, which is calcium carbonate, is the most abundant under this classification, and gets a section of its own further below.

crystal and mineral collection
ARAGONITE; Morocco, Africa
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
crystal and mineral collection
CERUSSITE; Tsumeb, Namibia, Africa
Lead Carbonate, PbCO3
crystal and mineral collection
MALACHITE with Chrysocolla; Arizona, USA
Copper Carbonate, Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
crystal and mineral collection
MALACHITE on Hematite; Arizona, USA
Copper Carbonate, Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
crystal and mineral collection
MALACHITE; Shaba Province, Zaire (Congo), Africa
Copper Carbonate, Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Azurite Morenci Arizona USA
AZURITE; Morenci, Arizona, USA
Copper Carbonate, Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Stichtite on Serpentine Tasmania Australia
Purple STICHTITE on green Serpentine;
Tasmania, Australia
Magnesium Chromium Carbonate,
Mg6Cr2(CO3)(OH)16路4H2O
Siderite Arizona
SIDERITE; Arizona, USA
Iron Carbonate, FeCO3
Zincrosasite Hemimorphite Smithsonite Mimetite Colorado USA
ZINCROSASITE with Hemimorphite, Smithsonite and Mimetite; Colorado, USA
Zinc Copper Carbonate
(Zn,Cu)2(CO3)(OH)2
Rosasite on Calcite Mapimi, Durango, Mexico
ROSASITE on Calcite
Mapimi, Durango, Mexico
Zinc Copper Carbonate
(Zn,Cu)2(CO3)(OH)2
Rosasite with Calcite Mexico
ROSASITE with Calcite
Ojuela Mine, Mexico
Zinc Copper Carbonate
(Zn,Cu)2(CO3)(OH)2
crystal and mineral collection
Purple SMITHSONITE; Choix, Mexico
Zinc Carbonate, ZnCO3
Smithsonite green pseudo-Sphalerite Colorado USA
Green SMITHSONITE with pseudo-Sphalerite; Colorado, USA
Zinc Carbonate, ZnCO3
Smithsonite Blue San Antonio Mexico
Blue SMITHSONITE; San Antonio, Mexico
Zinc Carbonate, ZnCO3
crystal and mineral collection
HYDROZINCITE; China
Zinc Carbonate, Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6

The Calcite Family

Calcite, like Quartz, forms a sizable part of my collection, and hence deserve a section of its own. Composed chemically of Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3), they belong to the Carbonate group as presented in the section above.

crystal and mineral collection
CALCITE on Marcasite; Missouri, USA
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
crystal and mineral collection
Orange CALCITE; Santa Eulalia, Mexico
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
crystal and mineral collection
CALCITE on Pyrite; Missouri, USA
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
Calcite on Pyrite
The same CALCITE shown at left, seen from the bottom side
crystal and mineral collection
CALCITE with Chalcopyrite; Missouri, USA
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
crystal and mineral collection
Yellow CALCITE with Pyrite; Missouri, USA
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
crystal and mineral collection
Large CALCITE, 1.5lbs from unknown locality
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3
Columnar Calcite
Columnar CALCITE; South Dakota, USA
Calcium Carbonate, CaCO3

VI. Sulphates, Chromates, Tungstates and Molybdates

Sulphates form when metals combine with a sulphate group (SO4), comprising of sulphur and oxygen. Likewise with chromates (CrO4), tungstates (WO4) and molybdates (MoO4) – chromium, tungsten and molybdenum with oxygen.

crystal and mineral collection
BARITE, blue; Utah, USA
Barium Sulphate, BaSO4
crystal and mineral collection
CROCOITE; Tasmania, Australia
Lead Chromate, PbCrO4
crystal and mineral collection
BARITE, pink orange; Morocco, Africa
Barium Sulphate, BaSO4
crystal and mineral collection
BARITE, white; Tennessee, USA
Barium Sulphate, BaSO4
Celestine blue Madagascar
CELESTINE; Madagascar
Strontium Sulphate, SrSO4
crystal and mineral collection
CELESTINE; Michigan, USA
Strontium Sulphate, SrSO4
Selenite orange Peru
SELENITE, orange Gypsum; Peru
Calcium Sulphate, CaSO42路H20
Selenite Peru exhibiting fluorescence under UV light
Same SELENITE at left exhibiting fluorescence under UV light
duckbill Selenite Peru
SELENITE, duckbill; Peru
Calcium Sulphate, CaSO42路H2O
Hubnerite North California
H脺BNERITE; North California, USA
Manganese Tungstate, MnWO4
Hanksite golden yellow California
HANKSITE, golden yellow; California, USA
Sodium Potassium Sulphate,
Na22K(SO4)9(CO3)2Cl
crystal and mineral collection
WULFENITE; China
Lead Molybdate, PbMoO4
selenite Morocco
This SELENITE (Gypsum) from Morocco measures slightly over a foot in length
Calcium Sulphate, CaSO42路H2O

VII. Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates

Phosphates form when metals combine with a phosphate group (PO4), comprising of phosphorus and oxygen. Likewise with Arsenates (AsO4) and Vanadates (VO4) – arsenic and vanadium with oxygen.

Apatite Blue Brazil
APATITE, blue; Brazil
Phosphate minerals, Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)
Torbernite Australia
TORBERNITE; Australia
Phosphate minerals
Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2路8-12H2O
Mimetite Mexico
MIMETITE; Mexico
Lead Arsenate Chloride
Pb5(AsO4)3Cl
Vanadinite Arizona
VANADINITE; Arizona, USA
Lead Vanadate Chloride, Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Vanadinite on Fluorescent Calcite USA
VANADINITE on fluorescent Calcite; USA
Lead Vanadate Chloride, Pb5(VO4)3Cl

VIII. Silicates

Silicates are metals or non-metals which combine with a silicate group made up of silicon and oxygen in a tetrahedral structure. Silicates are the most common of all minerals – there are more silicates than all other minerals put together, and almost a third of all minerals are silicates. After all, they make up 90% of the Earth’s crust. It is no surprise that they also form the bulk of my collection:

Garnet red Tanzania
Red GARNET; Tanzania, Africa
Nesosilicate, X3Y2(SiO4)3
Green Tourmaline Brazil
Green TOURMALINE; Brazil
Cyclosilicate, (Al,Fe,Li,Mg,Mn)3(Al,Cr,Fe,V)6
(BO3)3(Si,Al,B)6O18(OH,F)4
Tourmaline Brazil
Green TOURMALINE; Brazil
Cyclosilicate, (Al,Fe,Li,Mg,Mn)3(Al,Cr,Fe,V)6
(BO3)3(Si,Al,B)6O18(OH,F)4
Kyanite Black Brazil
Black KYANITE; Brazil
Aluminium Silicate, Al2SiO5
Kyanite blue
Blue KYANITE; Mtoko, Zimbabwe
Aluminium Silicate, Al2SiO5
Blue Kyanite
Blue KYANITE; Mtoko, Zimbabwe
Aluminium Silicate, Al2SiO5
crystal and mineral collection
DANBURITE; San Luis, Mexico
Calcium Boron Silicate, CaB2Si2O8
Danburite
DANBURITE; Mexico
Calcium Boron Silicate, CaB2Si2O8
Staurolite
STAUROLITE; Madagascar
Iron Aluminium Silicate, Fe2Al9Si4O22(OH)2
Topaz
TOPAZ, brown; Utah, USA
Silicate mineral of Aluminium and Fluorine,
Al2SiO4(F,OH)2
Hemimorphite and Adamite
HEMIMORPHITE and Adamite; Mexico
Zinc Silicate, Zn4Si2O7(OH)2路H2O
Amazonite
AMAZONITE; Colorado, USA
Potassium Aluminium Silicate, KAlSi3O8
crystal and mineral collection
APOPHYLLITE; India
Phyllosilicate, KNaCA4Si8O20(F,OH)路8H2O
Apophyllite and Stilbite
APOPHYLLITE with STILBITE; India
Phyllosilicate, KNaCA4Si8O20(F,OH)路8H2O
crystal and mineral collection
Green APOPHYLLITE; India
Phyllosilicate, KNaCA4Si8O20(F,OH)路8H2O
Chrysocolla
CHRYSOCOLLA; Arizona, USA
Hydrated Copper Cyclosilicate,
Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5(OH)4路nH2O
Cavansite on Heulandite
CAVANSITE on HEULANDITE; India
Calcium Vanadium Silicate,
Ca(VO)Si4O10路4H2O
Aegirine (Acmite) with small Microcline behind
AEGIRINE (ACMITE) with small MICROCLINE behind; Mount Malosa, Zomba, Malawi
Sodium Iron Silicate,
NaFe3+Si2O6
Dravite brown Tourmaline
DRAVITE (brown TOURMALINE); Brazil
Cyclosilicate,
Na(Mg3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Elbaite green with white Cleavelandite
Green ELBAITE with white CLEAVELANDITE; Skardu District, Pakistan
Sodium Lithium Aluminium Borosilicate, Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6Si6O18(BO3)3(OH)4
Fluororichterite
FLUORORICHTERITE; Ontario, Canada
Sodium Calcium amphibole,
Na(Ca,Na)Mg5Si8O22F2
Fuchsite green
FUCHSITE; unknown locality
Phyllosilicate mineral
K(Al,Cr)2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Garnet large
Large GARNET; North Carolina, USA
Nesosilicate, X3Y2(SiO4)3
Jasper
JASPER chunk; USA
A variety of Chalcedony
Mesolite Needles
MESOLITE needles; Oregon, USA
Tectosilicate Zeolite, Na2Ca2(Al2Si3O10)3路8H2O
Muscovite
MUSCOVITE; Brazil
Phyllosilicate mineral of
Potassium and Aluminium,
KAl2(AlSi3O10)(F,OH)2
Large Microcline Crystal Covered in Black Dendritic Psilomelane with some Orange Minium
Large MICROCLINE covered in black dendritic
Psilomelane with orange Minium; Old Sherman Tunnel Mine, Lake County, Colorado, USA
Potassium Aluminium Silicate,
KAlSi3O8
large Mica crimson red orange
Large crimson MICA; Brazil
Phyllosilicate mineral,
X2Y4-6Z8O20(OH,F)4
Natrolite
NATROLITE; New Jersey, USA
Hydrated Sodium Aluminium Silicate,
Na2Al2Si3O10路2H2O
Prehnite
PREHNITE; New Jersey, USA
Inosilicate of Calcium and Aluminium,
Ca2Al(AlSi3O10(OH)2
Sodalite fluorescent
SODALITE (fluorescent under UV); Canada
Tectosilicate mineral,
Na8(Al6Si6O24)Cl2
Diopside fluorescent
DIOPSIDE (fluorescent under UV); New York, USA
Pyroxene Silicate mineral,
MgCaSi2O6
Tourmaline on Matrix
TOURMALINE on matrix; Madagascar
Cyclosilicate, (Al,Fe,Li,Mg,Mn)3(Al,Cr,Fe,V)6
(BO3)3(Si,Al,B)6O18(OH,F)4
Muscovite
MUSCOVITE; Pakistan
Phyllosilicate mineral of
Potassium and Aluminium,
KAl2(AlSi3O10)(F,OH)2
Vesuvianite
VESUVIANITE; China
Sorosilicate mineral,
Ca10(Mg,Fe)2Al4(SiO4)5(Si2O7)2(OH,F)4
Vesuvianite green
Green VESUVIANITE;
Sierra de la Cruz, Coahuila, Mexico
Sorosilicate mineral,
Ca10(Mg,Fe)2Al4(SiO4)5(Si2O7)2(OH,F)4
Benitoite, Neptunite and Joaquinite on matrix San Benito California USA
BENITOITE, Neptunite and Joaquinite on matrix; San Benito, California, USA
Barium Titanium Silicate, BaTiSi3O9

Benitoite crystals are rare and gem-quality ones come mainly from the San Benito Mine in California, where it gets its name from. Benitoite was named the Official State Gem of California in 1985. Seen above is a specimen with some small blue Benitoite crystals, amongst some dark Neptunite and yellow Joaquinite crystals.

The Quartz Family

Quartz, a form of silicon dioxide SiO2, actually falls in the Silicates group in the section above, but due to the diverse types of this mineral and the numerous quantities that I own (over 70 pieces to-date), Quartz crystals deserve a section of their own.

My collection currently consists of over 30 Clear Quartz crystal points and clusters, 15 Smoky Quartz crystals including Elestials, 5 Citrine points, 15 Amethysts, 9 Brandberg Amethysts, and some Rose Quartz and Spirit Quartz varieties. The various colours are due to impurities of other trace elements found in each of these crystals. I also use Quartz for metaphysical purposes.

Clear Quartz Arkansas
Clear QUARTZ; Arkansas, USA
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Smoky Quartz Himalaya Tibet
Smoky QUARTZ; Himalaya, Tibet
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Amethyst Kazakhstan
AMETHYST on matrix; Kazakhstan
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Amethyst cluster Uruguay
AMETHYST cluster; Artigas, Uruguay
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Amethyst Scepter Madagascar
AMETHYST scepter; Madagascar
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Elestial Smoky Quartz Brandberg
ELESTIAL SMOKY QUARTZ; Brandberg, Namibia
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Brandberg Amethyst Goboboseb West of Brandberg
BRANDBERG AMETHYST; Goboboseb, Namibia
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Brandberg Amethyst Goboboseb West of Brandberg
BRANDBERG AMETHYST; Goboboseb, Namibia
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Brandberg Amethyst Goboboseb West of Brandberg
BRANDBERG AMETHYST; Goboboseb, Namibia
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2
Smoky Quartz large Nevada USA
Large SMOKY QUARTZ; Nevada, USA
Silicon Dioxide, SiO2

IX. Organic Minerals

Organic Minerals are naturally occurring minerals formed directly or indirectly by living organisms.

Due to their organic nature, they are not always accepted as minerals. One such example is Amber, made from ancient tree sap (hence organic) which is often found with an insect perfectly preserved within. Remember how the DNA of dinosaurs was extracted from a mosquito in the movie Jurassic Park?

Copal Colombia South America
COPAL; Colombia, South America
Mixture of Hydrocarbons
Jet mineral
JET; unknown locality
Lignite Coal, Hydrocarbon

Radioactive Minerals

This section is not listed under the usual classification, but I thought it’s special enough to be on its own.

These are specimens rarely found in personal collections, and I’m proud to say I own two such samples of radioactive minerals.

Euxenite (classified under Oxides) is an important mineral as ore of the rare earth elements it contains (see below) and is slightly radioactive.

Carnotite (classified under Vanadates), which is often bright to greenish yellow in colour, is an important ore of Uranium and is strongly radioactive. As such, it needs to be handled and stored with extreme care.

Euxenite
EUXENITE; Wyoming, USA
Yttrium, Calcium, Cerium, Uranium, Thorium, Niobium, Tantalum, Titanium, (Y,Ca,Ce,U,Th)(Nb,Ta,Ti)2O6
Carnotite Uranium Ore California USA
CARNOTITE; California, USA
Potassium Uranium Vanadate, K2(UO2)2(VO4)2路3H2O

Fossils

Fossils? Are they even minerals? In a way, yes.

Fossils are the remains of animals or plants that are preserved in rocks. Fossils may be internal or external moulds, and in the case of most of those in my collection, are internal moulds such as Ammonites, which consist of calcium carbonate similar to the Aragonite in Section V above.

To-date, there are four Ammonites and one Trilobite in my collection of fossils. I hope to expand this collection in the near future.

Ammonite Madagascar
AMMONITE; Madagascar
Mollusca > Cephalopoda > Ammonoidea
Trilobite Morocco
TRILOBITE; Alnif, South of Morocco, Africa
Flexicalymene ouzregui

Conclusion

“Looking at transparent crystals while reflecting on how these wonders of nature were formed over millions of years can quickly take anxiety and stress off one’s mind, and it is in these crystals that I often seek solace.”

There are other interesting specimens in my collection that have not been included above, including a light blue Beryl amongst Mica from Brazil and two large pieces of glassy Obsidian, one with red Hematite inclusions. These are currently kept in a container, and I have not had a chance to photograph them.

I find mineral collecting to be a very fascinating and rewarding hobby. Looking at transparent crystals while reflecting on how these wonders of nature were formed over millions of years can quickly take anxiety and stress off one’s mind, and it is in these crystals that I often seek solace.

Knowing that some of the crystals and minerals which come from well-known mines from around the world, some typical to only one region on the globe, and others so rare they are seldom found listed in encyclopaedia, which now sits on my shelf brings value and meaning to this pastime and collection.

It is also an interesting way to learn about other parts of the world, and how religions of the past were influenced in a significant way by crystals such as those presented above. After all, how often do you find the subjects of chemistry, biology, physics, geography and history (and maybe even anthropology) all rolled into one hobby?

I have also completed a collection of minerals which fall in the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Click here to see the article and sample specimens.

Meanwhile, do tell me in the comments section below which of the crystals and minerals above appeal to you!

UPDATES:

20.05.2014

The Devon Buy Crystal and Mineral Collection is listed in www.minerant.org as the first entry under the country Malaysia.

21.05.2014

Join the Crystal and Mineral Collectors of the World on Facebook! Click the banner below:

crystal and mineral collectors of the world fb

N.B. All photographs of crystals and minerals appearing on this site are the property of Devon Buy and www.devonbuy.com. They shall not be scanned, downloaded or reproduced in any way without prior consent from www.devonbuy.com. For enquiries, purchase and use of any of these photographs in magazines, journals, periodicals and reference materials, kindly contact me.

CLEAR QUARTZ CRYSTALS on eBAY
 
BOOKS ON MINERALS AND CRYSTALS (GEOLOGY) on AMAZON



guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

6 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Chenkuang Yap
6 years ago

Most are very good but some of the very stone-looking ones in the middle a bit boring-la. Great collection on the whole. I was also something like you – in search for the ‘source’ of things when young. Crystals lead us to the source of desire and power, ambition, even love etc.

Law Thim Fook
6 years ago

lovely! love the green tourmaline as well as the blue kyanite. so when are we going to be invited to view the REAL stuffs?

Adrian Tan
6 years ago

That’s a very comprehensive article!

May Chew
6 years ago

Wow, you can open a museum already. Very impressive the amount of knowledge and research that goes into this. Superb photography too of the specimens !

Anonymous
6 years ago

hi, those interested in buying a huge smoky quartz weigh 1.1 kg with water bubles inside it please contact me at madi_hashim@yahoo. com. Originally dig from malaysia soil.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!